1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

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VedRover
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1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

#1 Post by VedRover » Mon Oct 24, 2016 9:47 pm

I finally have some time on my hands to start posting the progress of my rebuild.

Late last year I bought me a 1988 Land Rover 110 at the US CBS General Order Merchandise Auction and then brought it back to Canada to rebuild.

Here she is sitting in the bonded warehouse in NC:
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The vehicle is almost completely original, except the engine was replaced from 2.5 TD to a 200 TDI and the bulkhead appears to have been replaced not too long ago as it’s in a very good shape, whereas the UK car report talked about bulkhead issues in 2007, so, I’m guessing, that’s when the previous owner replaced it to pass the MOT.

The rig (based on the timing of its’ seizure by the CBP and some remaining paperwork) is one of those, exported in 2013 by a company in North Carolina that caused a major issue in the US when dozens of trucks were seized from their rightful owners (http://jalopnik.com/why-are-the-feds-ob ... 1672381729). This one was seized right at the US port of entry. The issue with vehicle seizures was later resolved by Will, aka “The Defender of Defenders” (http://www.defendersource.com/forum/f61 ... 63852.html).
And my rig was sitting in a bonded warehouse in NC, waiting for the court case to be resolved, and was listed for an auction as soon as the dust settled in the courtroom. First time it was bought by a company in Vancouver for $7K, but then, I suppose, they never picked it up, and it was relisted at which time I scooped it up for a mere $201 (yes, that’s right, I’m not missing any zeroes here).

I then transported it as a bonded cargo to Calgary (in late November), thawed it for a day (antifreeze froze to gel, but not too bad to push the freeze plugs out, so I fortunately just needed to replace it), inspected it carefully, put a new battery in, and, low and behold, the zombie came back to life!

From what I saw right away, I knew that from the structural perspective, I needed to address rear crossmember, doors, sills, C-posts and second row seat base.

Rear crossmember (looking from behind and from the front) – nothing too bad, that can’t be fixed with enough duct tape and Bondo, right?!
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C-Post:
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Rear seat base:
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I also took it in for an out-of-province inspection and sure enough, they gave me a 4-page long laundry list that included mostly the structural issues I’ve noted above as well as a couple of oil leaks (ha-ha), addition of the third brake light, addition of rear bumper and addition of DRL (the latter being a bogus requirement, as the DRL is only required for vehicles manufactured after 1989). BTW, finding an out-of-province inspection facility for a RHD stick-shift Land Rover 110 in Calgary was one hell of a quest, as most facilities don’t deal with these vehicles as they “don’t have the specs, dimensions, etc.” even if you offer to give them a copy of the workshop manual with all that info.

So, I’ve been working away on it since then.

So the plan is (for major components):
• Rebuilt front row doors
• New sill rails and lower C-posts
• Rebuild rear tub
• Strip the vehicle to the frame (chassis), rebuild and galvanize the frame from the two frames I currently have
• Replace the gaskets and any worn components on all leaking parts (engine, tranny, transfer gearbox)
• Replace front/rear U-joints and rear diff oil seal
• Replace all worn balljoints
• Replace the clutch (old one works somewhat but I figured I’d do it now anyways while the engine and tranny are off the frame
• Replace the fuel tank (cleaning the old one will cost me as almost as much as buying a new one)

I’m not going to repaint it just yet, as I wanted to do a Polyurethane paint and am having difficulties finding a shop in Calgary. Plus, I might be moving to the Easdt Coast now that the Oil and Gas Bonanza is over for a while, where I’m certain I can paint the truck for less than a second mortgage worth that my greedy fellow Albertans would like to charge me for it.

Wish me luck!

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Re: 1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

#2 Post by VedRover » Mon Oct 24, 2016 10:21 pm

BTW, here's my post on the front door frames I've built for this project: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=8856. I'll post all my other updates here, though, going forward.

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1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild - C-Posts and Sill Rails

#3 Post by VedRover » Wed Oct 26, 2016 7:27 pm

And the saga continues… This time is C-Posts and Sill Rails.

As you can see from pictures below, the C-posts were toast. Lower sections, connecting to sill rails were essentially gone. Sill rails looked like they’ve been chewed by angry beavers too. I’m beginning to think that the vehicle was held together by the roof :D
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I was initially going to get these fabricated but then concluded it was cheaper and faster to just get the replacement pieces from YRM.

YRM parts, did not fit perfectly and needed some fiddling to get them in place. I left the old sill rail in place and used it as my guide for where the new piece should fit.
Of course most of the holes on the YRM piece did not end up where they needed to be. I ended up welding the two bolt holes closed and drilling new holes where they should be. I will also be match-drilling majority of the rivet holes. It would’ve almost been better if they didn’t drill any holes in their piece and let the installer match-drill them in place.

One lesson learned: the original YRM piece comes with the below piece straight (per the LR design) and it makes fit-up problematic. I left it as is on the first piece I’ve done and had a difficult time fitting it up (both to the upper piece and then to the sill and rear wing).
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So for the second piece I made a shallow bend, as if for lap-welding and it worked like a damn with the two pieces fitting up perfectly.
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Here’s RHS C-post piece welded together:
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I then marked the B-post on the spot before removing the sill rail and B-post from the vehicle so that I could later re-install it correctly.
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And removed the sill rail complete with the remaining B-post
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Lots of surface rust on the other side, Land Rover certainly created a dirt pocket there.
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I then removed the B-post off the old sill rail (8 spot welds). After cleaning the B-post from all the rust, I put it back in its position, installed new sill rail and riveted the C-Post to the rear wing for the final fit-up.

Once everything fit and after lots of measuring, I tacked the B-post and C-post on the new sill rail. I then removed the entire piece and welded it up.
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Put them back in and voila – perfect fit!
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Re: 1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

#4 Post by withabix » Thu Oct 27, 2016 4:06 pm

That has to be THE cheapest Defender ever imported in to Canada! (And the cheapest ever sold in the USA by a couple of zeros!!)

Leaves you with plenty of budget for the rebuild though!

Looking at your 'door' post, you know what you're doing :D

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Re: 1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

#5 Post by DrRangelove » Thu Oct 27, 2016 5:41 pm

$201?! :shock:

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Re: 1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

#6 Post by VedRover » Sun Oct 30, 2016 12:05 pm

DrRangelove wrote:$201?! :shock:
Aye, $201 I couldn't believe it myself.
The biggest upfront cost was $3K to transport a non-running vehicle in-bond from North Carolina to Calgary.

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Re: 1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

#7 Post by DrRangelove » Sun Oct 30, 2016 7:10 pm

Still, that is one sweet deal!
New coat if paint, new grill and a Defender decal and boom you can turn it around for 35k ;)

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Rear Tub Reflooring - Part I

#8 Post by VedRover » Fri Nov 11, 2016 10:06 pm

And the saga continues…..

The rear tub floor didn’t look too bad at first glance, except for aluminum cancer in the safety belt hook areas, however, the stiffeners didn’t appear trustworthy when looking from below.

So I pulled the floor off and sure enough the aluminum floor stiffeners (aka “top hats” are completely FUBAR.
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Struts didn’t look too bad, but would need to be blasted and galvanized or repainted. I contemplated fabricating new top hats briefly but then just ordered brand new top hats and galvanized struts along with a rear underfloor support from YRM.

While waiting for my new shiny YRM parts, I pulled the old crap out, cleaned and and Zinc-sprayed the existing metal contact areas.
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Thinking about what to use for the new floor, I checked the price of a precut floor plate from the UK, a cost of an 1/8” aluminum sheet and then, finally, in a stroke of wisdom, of a 1/8” checker plate (that’s base material thickness, not including tread height).
All the folks I called, though, were going to order a 1/8” checker plate in as they usually stocked thinner sheets. 4x6 sheet was going to run me $350 at most places I called. Pretty pricey but not much more than a plain sheet.
I then called another place and they said they could sell me a 4x8 sheet of a 1/8” checker plate for a “minimum order price” of $250. Not bad, I thought. The guy was reluctant to give me a price of an individual sheet, though, but then he finally gave in and said a 4x8 sheet was a bit over $125, so I could get two 4x8 sheets for a tiny bit over $250 if I wanted to.
Sonofagun, if I didn’t grill him on the individual sheet prices, he was going to sell me just one sheet for $250, and I thought I was getting a deal then!
Anyway, I picked up two sheets which now let me, pretty much, wrap the entire tub in it and still have some material left for a toolbox 

Here’s a glimpse of what it will look like after everything is said and one:
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I’m planning to make the rear seats upstand and all bottom floor panels (front and rear) from it, If I have any time left, I’ll cover the rear wheel wells/inward facing seats bases too. All for less than what I would’ve paid for a precut floor panel from the UK. The 1/8” plate thickness is a bit thicker than the original aluminum sheet (3mm) used for these parts, so it should work great.

When YRM parts showed up, I put a bit of primer and then also some vinyl tape on all galvanized metal parts where they could contact with aluminum top hats (will be adding more when installing the floor too). That’s my attempt to prevent galvanic corrosion.
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I then installed the struts and top hats (initially riveting them together from inside out using a hand riveter as the nozzle of the pneumatic one was too wide to fit inside a top hast profile) and fit the old floor for now, getting the tub ready for removal. The reason I went with temporary rivets is: a) I didn’t want to remove the fuel tank just yet and b) even with the tank removed you still can’t get to the second and third strut, as they are obstructed with the chassis crossmembers. I also didn’t want to just leave the struts unattached to top hats and remove the tub as I was concerned with maintaining the original geometry.
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With buddy’s help, the tub was pulled off and put away for subsequent work. The tub is not heavy at all, the two of us were able to lift and handle it easily.
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Once it was on the side, I drilled out the temporary rivets and put the final ones using pneumatic riveter (I’ve no idea how people can go about riveting the entire Landy with a hand riveter, I put just the 12 rivets in and I was tired from that, pneumatic riveter does the same job effortlessly).

My Landy now looks even less like a station wagon and more like a go-kart:
Image

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More Demolition

#9 Post by VedRover » Mon Nov 14, 2016 9:09 pm

“…I came in like a wreeecking baaool!... No naked Miley swinging on the ball, though, but other than that last week has been all about demolition, stripping the Landy down to bare frame.

Busy week as I’m trying to take advantage of the unusually nice and warm weather we’ve been blessed with here.

Removed the bonnet, grille, wings and bulkhead:
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Engine in all its oil- and other fluids-leaking glory:
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Removed seatbox and engine/tranny:
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Pulled other odds and sods (power steering, brake and fuel lines, fuel tank, engine and body mounts) off the chassis.
Corrosion was far better and bolts were the easiest to remove near oil leaks, naturally. I think that’s the true ingenuity of Land Rover engineering: engine and drive train oil leaks are in fact an active corrosion protection system! :lol:

As I was doing all of the above, my Landy just kept on dropping British dirt and sand all over my garage from god knows where, so when I was done, I’ve swept a pile the size of the Isle of Wight! I guess that’s why Land Rover is so opposed to people bringing old Defenders to North America – with every vehicle the UK loses a good chunk of its soil, so, they’re literally defending their homeland! :lol:

So I pressure washed my rolling chassis before going any further.
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Suspension, as expected, put up a bit of a fight, but nothing too horrible. I owned a Toyota Highlander that came from the Nova Scotia, and boy was every bolt a struggle there (lots of penetrating oil, MAPP gas, breaker bars, etc.) nothing like that on this one.
To the unknown Mechanic who used copper grease on almost all of the suspension bolts – “You da Real MVP”!

Stripped chassis
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And axles loaded up ready for me to take them to the DIY sandblasting yard in Calgary. I decided to media blast axles and suspension components and then POR15 them all before reinstall. Considered wire-wheeling/brushing for a moment but then decided to save me some time and elbow grease and blast them instead.
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The axles are HEAVY! I spent a good chunk of my day today dinking around trying to load them on the trailer. Really should’ve used a helper.

As always, as you take things apart, you find issues. I now decided I would put in all new shocks (two are on the verge of being shot) and springs and steering damper. While I will run 12K Lbs and 15K Lbs winches in the back and the front accordingly, I still really don’t want to lift a vehicle at all as it’s already barely fitting through my standard height garage door.
While this Landy will be a hunting truck, it will still mostly see forgiving terrain as anywhere I hunt I can drive a friggin sedan in if I really had to (IMHO, offroading is less about what and more about how you drive).

What should I run – Bilsteins with LR springs? Everyone else (OME, TF and the likes) want you to lift it by 30mm at least and there’s no way I would put in the Britpart (that’s what the vehicle had originally). I will be seeking collective wisdom on it.

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Re: 1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

#10 Post by red90 » Tue Nov 15, 2016 10:59 am

You don't need to lift for OME. They work with the stock suspension. Springs lifts do not affect suspension travel anyway, so it does not impact shocks. In order to change suspension travel, you need to do more than just change springs.

Konis are the best I've used in a normal priced shock. Much better than OME or Bilstein for ride quality on rough roads.

Not sure if you know there is an Alberta club.

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Re: 1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

#11 Post by VedRover » Tue Nov 15, 2016 9:54 pm

red90 wrote:You don't need to lift for OME. They work with the stock suspension. Springs lifts do not affect suspension travel anyway, so it does not impact shocks. In order to change suspension travel, you need to do more than just change springs.

Konis are the best I've used in a normal priced shock. Much better than OME or Bilstein for ride quality on rough roads.

Not sure if you know there is an Alberta club.
Thanks for the info, red90!

Yes, I saw the ALRE page. No "Projects/builds" forum category, though, so I wasn't active there, lots of good info on other stuff, including OOP (wish I saw that before I went for an initial OOP with a place that knew nothing about Defenders and insisted that I put a rear bumper (not even bumperettes, a full-blown bumper) on it). Will definitely not be going back to them for a reinspection.

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"Blasted" Day

#12 Post by VedRover » Tue Nov 15, 2016 10:01 pm

Went to the blasting yard and cleaned up my axles and suspension parts. Will never pay again another man to do it for me - too much fun and oddly satisfying too to see the rust and crud disappear in front of your eyes.
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Also went to Customs to clear my $3,5K order of parts as blasted DHL couldn't figure it out for me for 3 days. They also expected me to pay $1400 in duties, taxes and brokerage fees. Yeah right.... Will never trust DHL with clearing another package for me - too slow and too greedy. Too bad the UK parts store consistently ships with them as they are the cheapest upfront. At least, you can always clear your package yourself which is what I'll now do every time.
Ended up paying $400 in duties and GST combined, although CBSA did try to persuade me that I'm a business based on the number of parts I'm importing. It took some effort to persuade that it's just some parts for one vehicle (and not a complete vehicle kit or an order for a massive undercover Land Rover shop).

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Re: 1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

#13 Post by VedRover » Tue Nov 15, 2016 10:33 pm

VedRover wrote:
red90 wrote:You don't need to lift for OME. They work with the stock suspension. Springs lifts do not affect suspension travel anyway, so it does not impact shocks. In order to change suspension travel, you need to do more than just change springs.

Konis are the best I've used in a normal priced shock. Much better than OME or Bilstein for ride quality on rough roads.

Not sure if you know there is an Alberta club.
Thanks for the info, red90!

Yes, I saw the ALRE page. No "Projects/builds" forum category, though, so I wasn't active there, lots of good info on other stuff, including OOP (wish I saw that before I went for an initial OOP with a place that knew nothing about Defenders and insisted that I put a rear bumper (not even bumperettes, a full-blown bumper) on it). Will definitely not be going back to them for a reinspection.
KONIs are on sale in the US now, so I'm getting me a set of front (US$139 Ea) and rear (US$136 Ea) ones in a hurry!

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Chassis

#14 Post by VedRover » Fri Nov 25, 2016 9:26 pm

The plan for the chassis is to use the front piece from the current one and the rear piece from the one I’ve acquired from a fellow forum member.
The latter is from a 1995 MOD RHD and, unfortunately, the front piece is damaged beyond repair. I took it to the frame puller and they said they could attempt to straighten it but the cost in the end would be close to 6K. So, a non-starter there.
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Both frame pieces, once cut, will go to acid dipping (thank God, I found one in Calgary that’s still alive and kicking). Then it will be welded together and galvanized.

Before acid bath, I decided to replace both the old bulkhead outriggers as they looked like Swiss cheese. The RHS one was “repaired” in the UK in a very traditional fashion of on-vehicle replacement: old piece cut off as best as access allows, new Britpart piece cut to fit and welded on with pretty crappy welding.
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Of course, shoddy repair leads to issues, when I cut the old outrigger off, I found a soft spot in the frame that I patched up right away.
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I reckon, because of how the replacement piece was welded in, it closed the drain natural path, so water and moisture were trapped in that spot. Frame under the other outrigger (all-original) was fine.

Here’s both outriggers removed:
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Because the original support bracket was rusted and repaired before, I cut it off too and installed the one from the other chassis I have which was in like-new shape. Here it is, cut and beveled, ready for tacking:
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The replacement pieces I ordered are Bearmach and, unfortunately, the CL of the bolt holes was off by about 5 mm on each side if the pieces are installed the way Bearmach designed them to be installed. I learned that once I fit them on and tacked them in place. There was a lot of swearing and cursing, not my proudest moment. So the piece had to be negotiated to fit. I wish it was longer, then it would’ve been easier, as otherwise I ended up with 5mm holes between the frame and the outrigger edges on each side.

Those gaps I had to close by building up metal with multiple strings before the cap/fill.
Here’s pictures of root/strings and fill/cap:
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Lots of measurement, I hate rulers, levels and measuring tapes now. I expected minor dimensional issues, but I did not expect the new piece from a respectable supplier to be off by as much as 5 mm on one of the most critical measurements.

So, both outriggers are now in:
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For cutting, the best cut/splice location is in the central section, just in front of the front seatbox crossmember. The cut is made at 45 degrees. I wish I could do a 30 degree cut (something that’s a somewhat of a standard practice in aviation and heavy machinery repairs), but there’s not enough room for the 30 degree cut and the fishplates. So 45 degrees it is, which is an acceptable practice in automotive.

Cross-bracing was installed in place before the cut to keep everything in place. And the cut is made (blurred for artistic dramatic effect :-). Actually no, I didn’t realize picture was out of focus until I looked at it later, sorry):
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Loaded up on the trailer, ready for the acid bath, just 2 days later than anticipated (friggin’ Bearmach…):
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Should be bathing in acid for the next week, then I’ll be welding her up and taking her to galvanizers.

BTW, I wrote before I was getting KONI shocks - had to cancel that order. Unfortunately, no one in the US (or Canada) stocks them now, and a special order is 3-4 months. It's settled then - I will get OMEs instead and will get KONIs when these are shot and I can wait 3-4 months.

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More frame

#15 Post by VedRover » Sun Dec 04, 2016 2:09 pm

Frame is back from acid dipping.
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More cancer found that needed to be addressed.
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Rotten frame piece rebuilt:
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Almost done now, just one more weld from being complete.
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Frame still has some areas that have coating left, so, I’ll blast those areas clean before welding her up and taking to galvanizers. They say they would blast it too, but I: a) have a couple more pieces that need blasting; and b) kn ow that I’ll clean her up better than they would.

Calgary looks like this today, though, hopefully, that’ll clear up next week.
Image

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Frame Splicing

#16 Post by VedRover » Wed Dec 14, 2016 9:02 pm

That was one of the most labor-intensive projects after the doors. And nerve-wrecking too, as everything had to be measured and re-measured to make sure the frame was per the spec dimensions. Took about 2 days all in.

HAZ cleaned and edges beveled to ensure good penetration:
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Two pieces ratcheted together and aligned for fit-up. It’s -26C and I’m working in my garage with propane heater at full blast to keep me warm:
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What’s not shown is I welded pieces of steel to the inside of one frame piece (on all 4 sides of each box) to use as guides to help me align the boxes. That worked very well for me.

HAZ preheated above 50F to eliminate chances of a cold start and hydrogen cracking from trapped moisture:
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Frame tacked together:
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And after measuring and re-measuring, double- and triple-checking all dimensions, as well as a thorough prayer and sacrifice to the gods of fit-up and welding, welded together:
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Welds then ground flat to be covered with fishplates:
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Fishplates tacked in place:
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Once fishplates have been welded, I prettied them up a bit:
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Frame loaded on the trailer, ready to go to sandblasting. As you may recall, the plan was to clean up some spots that the acid didn’t get to:
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Of course, once you are spraying sand, it’s easy to get carried away, so I just gave the entire frame a bit of a blast:
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Frame now passed on to galvanizers, going to their Saskatoon plant, and I will be getting it back around Dec-21. Folks at the galvanizer told me it’s their 6th Land Rover frame this year, so, we are keeping them busy and there’s definitely more LR resto projects on the go in Alberta than what’s published in any community.

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Re: 1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

#17 Post by BlkP38 » Thu Dec 15, 2016 9:01 am

Job well done on the frame. Noted the tapered ends of the fish-plates to reduce any stress riser.
Look forward to seeing more of your work.
Eric.

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Re: 1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

#18 Post by Bill E. » Thu Dec 15, 2016 1:54 pm

Hi Vedrover,
I too am impressed with your work on this rebuild and wanted to share how much I enjoy each installment you post. Keep up the great work.
Bill

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Re: 1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

#19 Post by DrRangelove » Fri Dec 16, 2016 9:29 am

Looking great - Can't wait to see photos of the shiny galvanised frame!

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Meanwhile...

#20 Post by VedRover » Mon Dec 19, 2016 1:05 am

While the frame is enjoying its vacation in the galvanizing baths in Saskatoon I figured I’d get the underbody stuff ready for reassembly.
As I said earlier, I was always planning on POR15’ing axles and suspension components which all have been previously sandblasted.
With a cold blast in Calgary (temperatures well below -25C) and no heated workshop available, the Family Council decided that the parts be brought and painted inside the house. Here they are in what used to be kids playroom:
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Here they are painted:
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On the axles, I am also replacing the differential flanges (getting complete kits with upgraded seals), all bushings, all balljoints and a friggin’ rear axle breather banjo bolt that sheared off. I decided not to touch anything else for now as it all looks and functions OK, and as with any old cars, if you dare touch one little thing too soon, you will end up rebuilding the whole lot.

Lots of other stuff to do in the meantime to get the car ready for reassembly.
“…On the 6th Day of Christmas my Honey gave to me….. A fully assembled all-new rear fuel tank!”:
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Was putting it together and left it under the tree, my son thought it was a new toy present. My wife caught him attempting to shove stuff inside through the fuel filler. She managed to stop him before anything got inside…

BTW the bottom part of the fuel feed pipe was way too long and I cut approximately 5mm off to make it fit inside the tank. This seems to be the usual thing with the new tanks, at least, I came across a number of people having to do the same.

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Re: 1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

#21 Post by DrRangelove » Tue Dec 20, 2016 10:33 am

You have a very supportive and understanding wife, Mate!

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Re: 1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

#22 Post by VedRover » Fri Dec 30, 2016 10:14 pm

DrRangelove wrote:You have a very supportive and understanding wife, Mate!
I know, I'm a lucky man.

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Reassembly - Chassis and running gear

#23 Post by VedRover » Fri Dec 30, 2016 10:15 pm

Thanks everyone for the kind words and compliments, this must be one of the nicest forums I’ve ever been on.

I picked up my frame last week, but dropped and killed my phone the following day, so, no pictures from the pickup.
I jumped right on it and did the following between the holidays:

Installed the rear axle and pulled the wiring loom through the chassis:
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Cable pulling wasn’t too bad, fished it through using the cable fisher, taped the connectors tight to the cable, KY-jellied the chassis openings and thickest parts of the loom and slowly but surely pulled it through. Much less fun pulling the loom through the rubber grommets, though.

Put the front axle together:
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Polybushes are there because a full box of those came with my truck ( I immediately had a 100% return on my original $201 investment when I found that box), otherwise, there would be squeakies.

After trying different methods, described elsewhere, I came up with a very easy way of getting the old rubber/metal bushings out. I carefully hit the outer edge of the outermost metal sleeve with an air chisel (you can use regular hammer/chisel too) to bend it in over the rubber. No need to bend it too far and just take it easy so you are not damaging the good piece. The goal is just to bend the edge in to create a bevel Do it on both sides and then press it out using a shop press or vice. I used a shop press and didn’t have more than 1 ton of pressure on it when it came out. About 5-20 minutes of air chisel work and another 2 minutes on the press was all it took for me per bushing:
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And both axles are now installed:
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BTW, I also re-galvanized the wheel arches, they look awesome now:
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Overall, I really like the fresh look, too bad I won’t be painting the body panels just yet.

I will now Waxoyl inside the chassis and some of the weaker exterior spots too and carry on with the reassembly.

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JS
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Re: 1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

#24 Post by JS » Sat Dec 31, 2016 1:23 pm

Impressive work!
Thank you for posting updates & pictures.

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VedRover
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Re: 1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild - mechanical

#25 Post by VedRover » Sun Jan 15, 2017 11:06 pm

Couldn’t Waxoyl the chassis just yet due to low ambient temperatures, will be trying the upcoming week if the weather forecast is accurate.
In the meantime I put the engine back on the chassis and replaced the clutch.

I suspended the gearbox on the shop crane, removed the nuts and lifted it away. I didn’t remove anything that wasn’t already disconnected for engine/tranny removal from the vehicle. I’m sincerely puzzled why the shop manual and resto manual insist that you should remove the transfer box and a bunch of other stuff too. Even with in-vehicle replacement there’s a way to maneuver the entire assembly out of the way.
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The original clutch plate and cover (Valeo) weren’t in bad shape, hardly any rattle in the springs (so if anyone needs them, I can part with them for free), but the release bearing was pretty bad (sticky and noisy), I suppose, whoever did the clutch the last time didn’t replace the latter which was not their wisest move.
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New bearing was installed along with a new clutch plate and dust cover. I like to use the clutch alignment tool, makes the job a piece of cake.
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I also bought Britpart’s “Heavy Duty” fork kit with an intent to put in but the bugger broke during the install (the rivet holding the clip was not pressed good enough). I suppose the only heavy duty part of that kit was the cardboard box it came in… Goddamn Britpart. I’m grateful, though, that it broke right away and not a few miles down the road, I’d be even more pissed then. So the old fork went in, with new slip pads.
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Slap them back together, hand-tighten the nuts diagonally and torque them to spec. Done, time for a cup of tea.
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I also did a front diff oil seal, installing an upgraded oil seal and dust cover that allegedly aren’t as prone to leaking as the old leather ones. The kit came with a 24-spline flange, though, and mine is a 4-spline, so I had to reuse the flange. Time will tell.
Old gear oil looked like tar, looks like it hasn’t been replaced in a while. Went to Land Rover Calgary for laughs and inquired about the 80w90 gear oil causing them a slight panic. “…They said: “We haven’t had that spirit here since 1969…” © Eagles “Hotel California”. They haven’t had any for a while and moreover they haven’t had any 75w90 (which is what they recommend in lieu of 80w90 for Canada) on hand either (sic). Went to MOPAC and got me some RedLine 75W90 for a decent price which is what I’m pouring in.


Next up are: timing belt, new turbo, leaky crankcase sump and rocker cover gasket.

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VedRover
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Re: 1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

#26 Post by VedRover » Mon Jan 16, 2017 9:36 pm

If there was one thing in the entire chassis business that worried me it was how well the bulkhead would fit. Given that I replaced both bulkhead outriggers with the bulkhead removed, I had nothing but my measurements to rely on.
So, I fit her on and she fit perfectly, probably even better than originally. I felt a great deal of relief and celebrated that fact heavily….
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A few other odds and sods I was working on in the meantime:

New radiator core installed, as the old one was toast. Intercooler received a thorough internal flushing and looks brand new inside. The HD simple green is awesome. Before doing it myself, I (again for laughs) talked to Land Rover who would wanted $250 for it and they wouldn’t even use anything other than water. The rad shops wanted $150-200 despite the fact that the intercooler was removed and they would’ve hardly had any labor in it. It was a quick decision then to do it myself instead of paying someone a silly amount of money.

Radiator bracket and heater box all received “a lick of fresh paint” (some British dude was describing all his resto paint work as such and I like the expression so much that’s all I’m saying now).
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Heater box is also getting the new “Original Parts” sticker coming from the UK. All new seals throughout, of course.

I decided to put the self-leveling unit back on, and replaced both ball joints, gaiters, dust cover and spring clips. Found a solution to quickly and easily installing the ball joints on the bode unit. Most would suggest using a skinny wrench (you would need to find one or grind one down to fit in), vicegrips and other BDSM tools and techniques. I found that it’s easiest, since the ball joint can be taken apart, to first screw the pin into the bode unit, as that way the balljoint ring moves out of the way permitting unrestricted access for any regular wrench:
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Once it’s been screwed in, the entire assembly is then installed into their respective ball joint seats and tightened. Nice and easy and I didn’t even have to wreck a wrench ort my knuckles in the process.

I managed to scoop up what appears to be the last Bode unit top rubber gaiter in the known Universe. Land Rover in the US had one in their West Coast warehouse and knew nothing of its obsolescence. Land Rover Canada kept persuading me that there are only two of these remaining in the entire worldwide inventory, both in Spain and both tagged as “scrap”. I ordered one, had it shipped to our family friend in the US and then forwarded to Canada. When I received it I had me a Fry moment (the one in Futurama with the last can on anchovies in the Universe) and, just like Fry, I put it to good use without any afterthought.
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So much for now, hoping to Waxoyl the chassis tomorrow and, if I have any time left, work on the timing belt.

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rayhyland
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Re: 1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

#27 Post by rayhyland » Tue Jan 17, 2017 11:25 pm

Damn this is nice work. Can I send you a few of my trucks?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Ray Hyland
BCOverlandRally.com, NWOverlandRally.com
I drive a 113 (a 110 and three Series 1s)

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VedRover
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Re: 1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

#28 Post by VedRover » Thu Feb 02, 2017 12:46 pm

rayhyland wrote:Damn this is nice work. Can I send you a few of my trucks?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Thanks! You sure can but only once I'm done rebuilding mine.

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VedRover
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Re: 1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

#29 Post by VedRover » Wed Mar 01, 2017 11:02 pm

I’m still here, still working on it. Some house projects demanded my attention.

Anyway, in the meantime, I decided to attend to the timing belt.
Since I had no special tool for pulley bolt or time to get one, I botched me a “special tool” by drilling a hole in the pulley (not all the way through, just deep enough), and sticking a beefy hex key in it to jam it against the closest stationary piece of metal. It worked well, although the hex key is now bent. I consider it to be a special tool for tight access socket bolts…
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Hard to see on a pic, but there was some black fluff inside the timing chest. I know 3—tdi have an issue with black fluff, but not 200tdi’s. I couldn’t see any rubbing spots and injection pump sprocket had no freeplay whatsoever. So, I would for now think that the issue was caused by prior overtightening of the timing belt and just keep an eye on it.
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Of course, I sheared off one of the water pump bolts. I then tried everything: welding on a nut, leftie drill, easy out and bolt removers, and all failed, the bugger wouldn’t come out. I then decided to take the timing chest off.
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Crankshaft sprocket put up a fight during removal. Of course, that’s the only part, that, according to the manual should “come out with a gentle prying”. Every time I read something comes out easily on a Landy, I get a nervous twitch in my eye as I know it’s a bunch of lies. I botched me a “special tool” from a steering wheel puller and that made it somewhat easier to remove.
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Of course, Bearmach STC363 gasket kit was missing one gasket, so I had to order it separately and wait… So far, the only aftermarket stuff I’ve had no issues with is what I bought from Allmakes, everyone else failed me one way or another.

Anyway, all remaining parts received today, and everything went in finally. I made sure to use Hylomar Blue for the water pump gasket areas. Interestingly enough, it has Land Rover part number (RTC3347) and is easiest and cheapest to get from the UK, I just ordered it with the rest of my parts. While I was at it, I replaced all oil seals, and bolts and a stud. I also put in a new water pump as the old one, while working, was reaching the end of its life.
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Ne belts are going in too…

The old oil pan was leaking at the seal, so I removed it, cleaned and re-installed it with new RTV sealant, hopefully, that should address the leak that it had.
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I also had to deal with the broken and abandoned breather banjo bolt on my rear axle. The original one snapped and then the easy out bolt remover broke off as well during attempted retrieval. I decided to simply drill and thread a new hole for it. The thread is 1/8”-28 BSP, so both the tap and the drill bit had to be ordered from the UK for lack of better options (Amazon Canada had crappy quality options only). My wife giggled when she saw an order from “Tap and Die” in my email, she thought it was for some extreme tap dancing classes.
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To make sure I remove most if not all of the metal shavings, I removed the half-shaft and put in a piece of cardboard (bent in a shape of a “V”). I then drilled and tapped the hole, using plenty of Wurth cooling oil to keep most of the shavings on top.
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I then pulled the cardboard and voila – the rest of the shavings came out. I’m not in any way saying that all of the shavings have been removed, but that’s the best that could be done under the circumstances. Whatever is left in the shaft will come out in the next oil change.
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All done and ready
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New diff oil seal and flange installed as well, old one was leaking.
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Will now continue to put together the engine bay, and start fitting up the body panels.

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VedRover
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Re: 1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

#30 Post by VedRover » Tue Apr 04, 2017 7:44 pm

The project is very much alive, I just hadn’t been able to post any updates for a while. I received a job offer recently and relocated to Greater Montreal area, so I had to slap the Landy back together in a hurry while my wife was managing packing and worked on preparing our Calgary home for sale. Basically, I needed to go from a rolling chassis to a running vehicle in 2 weeks.

So:
New turbo went in. Getting to two of the nuts holding the turbo on the manifold was no fun (not enough room to fit a wrench over the nut), so I botched me a “special tool” by grinding one side of a wrench off at an angle, to make one side of a box thinner. Worked like a charm. Two of the studs snapped, though, but once the old turbo was removed, came out without too much of a fight.
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Put in new oil feed pipe while I was at it, the old one, while not completely destroyed, didn’t look trustworthy.
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I also replaced all cooling hoses with new silicone ones (not shown on pictures) as well as replaced the last of the PAS hoses that originally was OK but crapped out as I was reinstalling everything.

I put together rear tub, installing new checker plate floor and upstand (upstand not shown on pictures). Later, when I have the time, I’ll TIG them together, for now, I just riveted them to the support beam. I really like the new look and am happy I’ve gone down that route.
New cappings and corner pieces went in place and new lights installed all over (except for side repeaters, headlights and license plate light).
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I then installed the rear tub side panels and roof, and adjusted everything to make sure it all fit where it’s supposed to, before tightening any bolts.
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Once that was done, I put in the front wings, radiator and finished the remaining works in the engine bay.
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So it came to the most nerve-wrecking day of all: the day I would attempt to start the darn thing. I had no idea whether it will start and run, given the depth of disassembly I’ve gone to, including replacement of the clutch and timing belt, and having disconnected almost everything.
The engine turned at the first attempt which I though was a good sign. Of course, I then attempted to start with the solenoid disconnected and spent a good 30 minutes alternating between attempts to manually prime the pump and turning the starter. As soon as I realized my mistake, slapping my forehead Homer’s “D’Oh” style, and connecting the solenoid, the engine started right away, spitting diesel foam from the fuel filter vent, so I had to immediately shut it down, mop everything up, prime and restart. I felt like a driller striking oil!
So, after idling for some time, revving up to make sure turbine kicked in at the right RPM and that everything worked and nothing leaked, I went in and drove it out of my garage. Amazingly, the gears shifted and everything worked. I took it for a quick spin around the block and was very happy with how it ran.

After that, I quickly put together the front doors (2nd row doors were put together earlier), and slapped everything together to make it transportable. As the house was being packed at the same time, a few boxes with parts were packed so I had to improvise in a few instances 
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Britpart door seals did not fit well, they were approx. 3/4” wider for 2nd row doors and approx. 1/2” wider for the fronts. I initially was concerned that I screwed up the geometry, however, the doors and old seals fit perfectly. So, I guess it’s just the Britpart issue again. I will try getting LR seals to see if they will be any better.

Once the vehicle was roadworthy in my opinion, I drove it across the city (including Glenmore and Deerfoot) to my buddy’s place, where it will be later picked up and transported to my new place in Greater Montreal. With zero sound proofing (even trim panels are not installed at this time) engine and, especially, turbo sounds could be heard very well, especially at 110kmh, it felt like I was in a T-72 tank.
Here we all are, leaving Calgary for good:
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I’m looking forward to getting it to its new home and continuing to work on it until it can be plated in QC (my first priority) and repainted.

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VedRover
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Re: 1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

#31 Post by VedRover » Tue Apr 04, 2017 7:56 pm

Oh, forgot to mention one thing: windshield replaced, new one was custom-cut in Calgary from a truck windshield (6mm thk, though, not 5 or 4 but it did fit well into the new rubber). Installed cost was approx. $270 (and since new glass was thicker than original, I had them install it for me to minimize my risk), which is approx $100 cheaper than getting anything shipped from US or UK (sure, the glass there is 70 quid but then they crate it, bringing just the shipping cost to approx $240), and the way it was cut, it still has all DOT markings on it, I'm very happy with the end result. Whenever I will be replacing it again in the future, I'll do the same thing.

ryancr500
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Re: 1988 Land Rover 110 CSW Rebuild

#32 Post by ryancr500 » Sat Apr 27, 2019 10:57 pm

Hows your rover coming??

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